Each week during the epidemic, Neil sends out a message in our weekly Newsletter which is distributed by email. Here are the most recent messages. We started this in Mid-March 2020

2021


Second Sunday of Easter 11th April 2021

Hello everyone,

It was lovely to see some of you last Sunday afternoon in the churchyard. The weather was very  kind to us and it was great to be able to gather and share some time together. We met some new friends and managed to reconnect with others. Thank you too for those who have joined us online or who we have delivered services to, it has also been brilliant to receive your messages over Holy Week and Easter.

I’ve always loved that Easter isn’t a day, but the start of a season, and thought it’s a shame that, just like Christmas, the shops seem full of Easter before it’s here, and then it’s over and on to the next thing. Wouldn’t it be lovely if Easter Day was the start of the Creme Egg season, rather than the date when no more are ordered and the eggs go onto the remaindered shelf and disappear in a crowd of bargain hunters? This is the time when we see how the church was built and how we made the transition to being led by Jesus in a different way, with the coming of the Holy Spirit.

There are preparations to be made here too, as we recommence services in the building and work out how they can change as COVID restrictions are gradually lifted, and as we look to our Annual Meeting here on Sunday 18th April and in the Partnership on the 22nd. I hope you have had chance to read our Annual Report and pray about the forthcoming elections. We really would welcome nominations, please do send them into Karen Ho by the end of Monday 12th please. The coming year will be an important one and we would value voices new and old as we look to new possibilities.

God bless,
Neil


Easter Day Sunday 4th April

Happy Easter! Christ is risen, Alleluia!

As we give thanks today for all Jesus has done for us, and reflect on the promises of God, I was reminded of the words of Bishop Steven in his Easter sermon last year, which still speak to us now:

‘Jesus is risen and that changes everything. Death becomes a gateway and not an ending. Life is lived in the light of eternity. Love endures beyond the grave. The meal we share today is a foretaste of a banquet in heaven. This invitation to life is open to everyone. There is no need to be afraid.

Because of Jesus, resurrection is the pattern of the world… There will be lessons we can learn in this season of what is really important and essential. In the meantime we pray and love and hope and encourage one another in the faith of the resurrection.

Because of Jesus we are able as the people of God to face our mortality and see beyond it. Christ is risen. We have new hope. In the words of the hymn: Be bold, be strong for the Lord our God is with you.’

From next week we will start to have short said services in the building on a Sunday morning at 9.30am. We must still wear masks and socially distance, so numbers will be limited and you will need to book. Over the next few days we will be in touch to ask which, if any, of the services in the four weeks 11th, 18th, 25th April and 2nd May you’d like to attend and make a fair allocation of places. If there is demand, we will also look at a repeat midweek. We will continue with our online services too and we’d love to see you, online or in person.

God bless,
Neil


Palm Sunday 28th March 2021

Hello everyone,

And so Holy Week is upon us! The highs and lows, ups and downs of the most amazing week in history. Cheering crowds on Palm Sunday, baying mobs later on.

There’s a lot going on here and it’s all on a separate notice. Please note there will be an outdoor Communion service in the churchyard at 3pm on Easter Sunday. I really hope you are able to come, it will be lovely to be able to gather, albeit still distanced, to celebrate the resurrection together. It would really help the planning if you could email me whether or not you’ll be there, but everyone’s welcome even if you haven’t booked. There will also be communion delivered with a paper service as we did at Christmas, and a Zoom service at 6pm for those who’d prefer to join online. This will also be the backup in case of bad weather.

On Maundy Thursday at 7.30pm on Zoom there will be a Communion in the context of Passover led jointly with Rev David Lewis. There are a few items you might like to get in preparation if you want to share the full experience (listed with the service details), but again they’re not compulsory. David will be leading a virtual communion, inviting you to bring your own bread and wine. I’m sorry we can’t be together in the same room to share a meal, but we will be getting back to having some services in the building again after Easter, more details over the Easter weekend.

The reports and information for the Annual Meeting will be appearing this week. Please do look out for them and of course prayerfully consider what role God might be calling you to play in our life here together.

God bless,
Neil


The fifth Sunday in Lent 21st March 2021

Hello everyone,

This week we come to one of the stranger Sundays in Lent. Traditionally it’s called Passion Sunday, the beginning of Passiontide, when the mood changes and we really start to home in on the cross. In more recent times some denominations have combined Passion Sunday with Palm Sunday, next week. There we have an invitation to read the whole of the story, one or two complete chapters of a gospel, to give us the big picture before we walk through Holy Week.

I would never want to miss out on the palms though. There is something very important about remembering the adulation of the crowd, of Jesus fulfilling some of the prophecies of the Old Testament, and of course of the reminder of how fickle we humans can sometimes be as the cheers of the crowd turn into ‘Crucify!’ in so few days. So next week there will be Palm Crosses delivered with the service sheets for those of you who get a physical delivery through your door, but I want to open the offer up to everyone – if you would like to receive a cross for next week, email me or leave a phone message and we’ll get one to you.

As we’ve mentioned in the bulletin recently, we were very saddened to hear of the news of the death of Dick Grace. There may also be a small number of places available to attend in person, if you would like to go, please contact me and I will liaise with Dick’s family to ensure numbers are correct.

God bless,
Neil


The fourth Sunday in Lent 14th March 2021

Hello everyone,

This week is Mothering Sunday. We’re very aware that this can be a day with very different emotions, and so this week there are two services on the website and attached to the bulletin. One focusses on joy and celebration, the other is more reflective, and we hope you find something that’s helpful.

At Church Council this week we continued our discussions about plans for Easter and for resuming services in the church building. On Easter Sunday, as well the Zoom service in the morning, we are hoping to hold an Outdoor Service in the afternoon – please be praying for the weather to be kind! We will also be looking to start short said services in the building, repeated on a Sunday and Wednesday morning, in a similar way we did before Christmas. We will build on these as restrictions ease.

There are lots of online activities in the pipeline for Holy Week and Easter – reflections on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evening, a Passover Meal with Communion organised jointly with Christ Church, and a series of reflections during the day on Good Friday, please do keep a look out for more details. Also, the Creative Space team from the Zoom service on Sundays have produced a pack of great ideas, activities and resources for being creative during Holy Week, thanks especially to Jan and Tracey for their hard work. We have learned a lot this last year about how engaging creatively can help us connect with God, in trying the creating ourselves, and seeing what others create – please do get in touch with Jan for your packs, even if you don’t come to zoom church. There is no obligation to share what you make! All the details will be in an email and included with paper services this week

God bless,
Neil


The third Sunday of Lent 7th March 2021

Hello everyone,

This week I’d like to share some excerpts from Pope Francis’ Lent Message this year, focusing on faith, hope and love.

Faith calls us to accept and live the truth revealed in Christ which means, first of all, opening our hearts to God’s word, which the Church passes on from generation to generation. This truth is not an abstract concept reserved for a chosen intelligent few. Instead, it is a message that all of us can receive and understand thanks to the wisdom of a heart open to the grandeur of God, who loves us even before we are aware of it. Christ himself is this truth.

When he meets the woman at the well,  Jesus speaks of the Holy Spirit, bestowing a hope that does not disappoint. Jesus had already spoken of this hope when, he said that he would “be raised on the third day”. Jesus was speaking of the future opened up by the Father’s mercy. Hoping with him and because of him means believing that history does not end with our mistakes, our violence and injustice, or the sin that crucifies Love.

Love rejoices in seeing others grow. Hence it suffers when others are anguished, lonely, sick, homeless, despised or in need. Love is a leap of the heart; it brings us out of ourselves and creates bonds of sharing and communion.

Dear brothers and sisters, every moment of our lives is a time for believing, hoping and loving. The call to experience Lent as a journey of conversion, prayer and sharing of our goods, helps us – as communities and as individuals – to revive the faith that comes from the living Christ, the hope inspired by the breath of the Holy Spirit and the love flowing from the merciful heart of the Father.

God bless,
Neil


The second Sunday of Lent 28th February 2021

Hello everyone,

It was really good to hear the Government plans this week for the way forward in the coming months, looking to reduce the restrictions we have been living with. I’m glad that we have been shown all the plan in one go, and I’m glad that the intention is that the timetable will be driven by the data rather than the date. I really hope that the restrictions will soon be gone, but I would rather it took a little bit longer than we hope, than it happened sooner but restrictions had to be reimposed later. Official details are still emerging and over the next few weeks we will be looking at how, with  the easing of restrictions we can begin activities back in the church building. We will keep you in touch with what’s happening, and won’t abandon online. It’s been good to hear that more folk are being able to get their vaccinations too. Sadly, I have seen some scary lies about vaccine safety being circulated. If you do see anything that makes you nervous, please do check it out through proper medical channels.

At our Stantonbury Ecumenical Council Meeting last week, we discussed the proposals for the Partnership review some more, including determining the decision-making process and agreeing that we did want to move forward and make the Partnership work more collaboratively, in a more mission-focused way. I am very pleased that these have been agreed, and also that we will have more regular meetings to continue the progress and agree more of the details of the document. We also had an additional church Council meeting this week about the review to help our SEC reps represent our views. Please do keep on praying for the review process and ask any questions you want.

God bless,
Neil


The first Sunday of Lent 21st February 2021

Hello everyone,

During the Ash Wednesday service this week I asked everyone their thoughts on giving up something for Lent this year. I had been struck by Kara’s reflection on Tuesday about whether it was a good idea, given that we’ve all had to give up so much this year whether we wanted to or not. There was a good exchange of plans people had for themselves this Lent, which carried on after the service as we chatted together. In the end we found a thread which ran through many of the ideas – making space. In some cases it was physical – decluttering – in others it was mental or spiritual – making time to read, or to exercise and have time and space to see things differently even when we’re in the same room all day. We shared our hopes for the spaces that might be created and I wondered whether this might be something for us all to consider this Lent? What space is God calling us to make in our lives? And let’s see what has happened to those spaces as our Lenten devotions turn to Easter joy!

Also, for our Zoom services in Lent we will be trying open service planning. Each Sunday at 4pm there will be a zoom meeting to plan the next Sunday’s service. We will begin by reading the readings together prayerfully, then try and discern together a theme or question or direction, and from that plan a service. You are absolutely welcome to just come and listen. I hope that it will be relaxed enough that we can be a bit brave, but no-one will be forced into anything, and being part of the planning and preparing does not mean you have to speak! This is an experiment, and like all experiments its won’t always work. It will need us all to be kind and generous as we try this. Please pray!

God bless,

Neil


The Sunday before Lent 14th February 2021

Hello everyone,

As we approach Ash Wednesday and the beginning of Lent this coming week, I find myself thinking back to last Lent. You may be able to remember back to our times with Gill Lovell and talking about hopes, dreams and plans for the future of the church, and the models we made in our groups and shared with everyone in church over the following weeks. You might also remember the large pieces of paper on the walls where we began to write about what we thought could be done in the short term on one side, and in the longer term on the other. I remember looking at one of the long-term suggestions which said ‘more use of social media and online’ and knowing that it was true, but being daunted about how on earth we could achieve it. I remember too, being overwhelmed by the number of people that came to the first Sunday afternoon Lent Group as we looked through the Beatitudes and getting so much out of our times together.

Of course, things changed. A lot. And the Lent Group finished up their sessions online – and continued on afterwards and continued to be a joy and a source of encouragement. What seemed impossible just a few weeks before became a reality: an inexpert, provisional, experimental reality. Much of what we have all experienced since last Lent has been very difficult and painful, but we have also discovered a great deal too, and found new ways of being a community and a church. As we come again to Lent, perhaps we can use this time to lament what we have had to miss out on, and also to examine what we have learnt and discovered, as we again move towards Easter and recollect the great triumph of Light over death and darkness.

God bless,

Neil


The second Sunday before Lent 7th February 2021

Hello everyone,

Many of you will remember Kara, who has led some of our online services in the past few months and organised the material for the online version of the Advent Calendar. Good news, she will be back with us for a placement! She wanted me to share this message:

‘I am really pleased to be joining you again for the period of Lent, Holy Week and Easter working closely with Neil and also the team across the wider Parish. Shrove Tuesday will be a little different but I am looking forward to joining you in your kitchens on Zoom for a Ready Steady Cook style pancake party. The party will include time to prepare your batter and for it to sit as I share my reflections on Lent. If you have a preferred recipe please do make it to your own tastes, or buy ready made, but I will be running through a simple cook along for my own family’s favourite of Scotch pancakes (attached). Over the last year they have become a weekend breakfast because they are easy enough to make even before the coffee has kicked in! I really look forward to seeing you all again then and journeying with you as we travel once again the story of the greatest escape from lockdown. Blessings, Kara’

Also during Lent, many of the housegroups will be following the ‘Live Lent’ material from the Church of England (#LiveLent 2021 church resources: God’s Story, Our Story | The Church of England ). Why not join one? Let me know if you’re struggling to get the material. Also, on Sundays at 4pm, Zoom church are doing Open Planning for the following week service (you can come without committing to lead anything!). The Methodist Circuit are also doing a Lent Course covering issues of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion on Tuesday afternoons or Thursday evenings starting on the 9th and 11th Feb, please email moffoot285@btinternet.com.

God bless,

Neil


Fourth Sunday after Epiphany 31st January

Hello everyone,

This week we’re looking towards the festival of Candlemas and I’d like to say a big thank you to everyone who has prepared worship this weekend. This marks the end of the focus on Jesus’ birth and early life and ministry, and is the point where we start to look forward towards Lent and Easter. The gap between Candlemas and Lent varies from year to year, and in 2021 it’s only a couple of weeks, so I’d like to share with you some of what we hope will be going on this year.

I love pancakes, and I love pancake parties. This year it will have to be a bit different though, so on Shrove Tuesday (16th February) we’ll be having an online pancake party on Zoom. You will have to make your own pancakes (or buy them ready-made!), but we will send out a recipe with the joining instructions, along with a recipe for Scotch pancakes, which are smaller and thicker, but much easier to make – and taste great too. We can share ideas about our favourite toppings or fillings and see how easy it is for the camera to capture our attempts to toss them…

The next day, Ash Wednesday, there will again be the opportunity for Communion, in the same way that we did it at Christmas. Please let me know if you would like a consecrated wafer delivered to you, and there will be a paper service supplied for you to follow if you wish, or you can join on Zoom in the evening and we can share the wafers together at the same time from our homes.

There will be more details coming out soon, especially with opportunities to join Lent Courses or find out about Lenten devotional material. Watch this space!

God bless, Neil


Third Sunday after Epiphany 24th January

It was great to be able to bring you news here last week about gentlespaces, the bereavement support groups that are being set up in Milton Keynes with volunteers from many different churches, including us here in Bradwell, and organised through the Mission Partnership.

Over the last couple of weeks there has also been a notice with some preliminary details of another initiative happening through the Mission Partnership, aimed at helping us to deepen our discipleship. There’s more to tell you now and I believe this could be a real help to individuals, groups and churches, so here goes:

The Vine is a new initiative of MK Mission Partnership, formed in response to the widespread interest in intentional discipleship groups.

We will:

  • Create space in which roots of faith can be deepened
  • Create small groups in which Christian character can be developed
  • Create a support base from which fruit of discipleship can be grown
  • Create a wider network through which mission can flourish

The Launch Event will we held on Zoom at 7.30pm on February 10th. If you’d like to book a space, please email missionpartnership@talktalk.net. They would also be happy to pass on details to you if you’d like to know more but can’t make the Launch Event.

On the Mission Partnership website, there’s also a great series of Epiphany Reflections from Rev Matt Trendall from the Walton Partnership which is well worth spending time with.

God Bless Neil


Second Sunday after Epiphany 17th January

Hello everyone,

I’d like to say a big thank you to everyone who help put on the extra coffee drop-ins after Christmas that we held on Zoom. I know how much it helped those who came along and it’s great to be able to support each other in this difficult time. The Church Council are very actively looking at how we can  carry these on more extensively and make them available more widely, so please do watch this space and let me know if you think you might be able to help out with this too.

On a similar note, in October there was a message about gentlespaces – which is a new initiative by the Milton Keynes Mission Partnership, designed to help people who have been bereaved or otherwise grieving. The plans for the initial launch back then had to be cancelled because of the autumn lockdown, but now things are back on!!!

gentlespaces groups are for people who would appreciate meeting with others in a similar situation, and all groups will have trained, DBS checked volunteers to help support them. They are free of charge! At the moment, the groups will meet via Zoom, but the hope is that in-person meetings will also be available in the future when the situation has improved and they can be held consistently.

If you would like to join one of the groups, please ring (01908) 382318 to book your place.  Sessions are available at a variety of times. These are groups of people meeting together and so are not a one-to-one counselling service. Also, they are not able to cater for under 18s.

Several members of Bradwell Church and other churches in Stantonbury Partnership are involved in helping with these groups, please keep all the volunteers and participants in your prayers, and use them if it would help you.

God bless,

Neil


First Sunday after Epiphany 10th January

Hello everyone,

I’d like to begin by sending my best wishes to you for this new year. Although it begins in renewed lockdown and difficulties and hardships in many homes, communities and over the whole world, the continuing rollout of the vaccine does give us the prospect of things being different.

Over the last couple of weeks, the rise in coronavirus infections in Milton Keynes means our attitudes have to be different – if we’re amongst people, in a supermarket for example, instead of the possibility of one of our fellow shoppers having COVID, we’re now in the situation where it is now very likely one of them is. A number of our members, or their close family, have contracted the virus now. We are grateful for answered prayer, but we need to continue to pray for recoveries, and also for those who have lost friends and family. Please be careful and follow all the guidance and regulations. Please do ask if you need help or contact with others. Please do also continue to pray for all frontline workers who increase their own risk for our benefit.

The season of Epiphany reminds us of the occasions when the realities of who Jesus was and is were made known to us – the visit of the Magi, Jesus’ baptism, the wedding at Cana and others. Can we find ways of making sure that we keep on making them known today please? Amidst so much uncertainty, hardship and conflict at the moment (the results of the events in Washington are still unfolding as I write) the gospel gives true hope, and hope built on something that is solid and will last.

God bless,

Neil


2020


Fourth Sunday in Advent 20th December 2020

Hello again,

‘Twas the bulletin before Christmas… This year, though, there is more to say than usual. COVID cases are rising rapidly to high levels we have not seen before in Milton Keynes. The situations we have looked at in other parts of the country are now with us here. Please be careful and stick to the recommendations on keeping yourself safe. It’s all the more difficult since many people had planned to meet up with family and friends over the Christmas period and are now uncertain over whether to go ahead with them. I am so sorry for everyone who is facing disappointment as things you were looking forward to are having to be put off.

There is hope for the future, as the vaccine is starting to become available. If you’re in the categories eligible to get the vaccine, do take the opportunity and if you’re struggling to get through to get an appointment, do keep trying even though it’s frustrating.

Whatever this Christmas looks like for us, whatever we are sorry we can’t do, whatever we are glad we still can, we still remember that Jesus was born for us. He was born in an unexpected place, without the usual family around. He was born in unstable times, and the family were forced to flee to Egypt to keep him safe. He was born with an uncertain future, where strange people came with gifts and prophecies of death as well as glory. The Good News that Jesus is born, of Emmanuel, God with us, was Good News then, is Good News now and will be in the future – however we are able to celebrate. Please pray for and support each other as we live through these strange and unsettling times.

May you know the love and peace of Christ this Christmas.

God bless,
Neil


Third Sunday in Advent 13th December 2020

Hello ,

The Christmas we moved to Bradwell, I wrote in our Christmas letter of Neil’s new job, the plans for the boys’ education, and then ‘I have no idea what I will be doing, but have almost given up being surprised….’
As I come this week to be licensed as a pioneer lay worker with the Anglican Church Mission Society, charged with living this out in online church, writing in a pandemic, I have to admit to being quite surprised after all!

I think I thought pioneers were people with purple hair who worked with bikers. Well, some of us are, but many others are not! What we have in common is a sense that God is operating outside our traditional ways of being church, a willingness to experiment (and fail), a calling to enable others by listening and learning together, and a desire to create spaces for the questions and experiences that connect people to God and each other in the places where we find ourselves – or are sent.

I’m so grateful for all your prayers, and especially to those of you who have experimented with me in small groups and wrestled with me with questions raised by the course. The big lad and Neil have buttressed me throughout, often well beyond their comfort zones, and I could not have managed the academia without them. And the smaller one has danced ahead of me into the presence of God, and showed me what happens when we let go of what we think we know about church, and fix our gaze on Jesus.

God is doing so many new things. Let’s explore together.
Love Sophia


Second Sunday in Advent 6th December 2020

Hello again,

So, Advent is here! I hope you’ve had chance to check out the brilliant Advent Calendar on the gates or online – thanks so much to Ros, Kara, Alan and Paul for making this happen and to everyone who has supported all that we do over the last couple of weeks.

Someone asked me about Advent themes earlier this week, and of course there are different one. In  Creative Space on Sunday morning we’re thinking about Hope, Peace, Love and Joy; in the Advent Course it’s Patriarchs, Prophets, John the Baptist and Mary; and there are others, including the very traditional ones: Death, Judgement, Heaven and Hell. At first glance, it’s understandable if we react by wondering how these can all be referring to the same thing, they do seem so very different. Yet, they do fit together. During Advent we are encouraged to reflect on Jesus’ first coming into the world at his birth, and what the signs and events surrounding it might signify, which is where the Patriarchs etc come in. But we’re not just to do that so we can look back, we should use the time of reflection on Jesus’ first coming to also reflect and prepare ourselves for him coming again (where the Death, Judgement etc comes in) to usher in the coming of his Kingdom in all its fullness. And in that fullness there will be Hope, Peace, Love and Joy. We live in this in-between time, the now and not yet, where these things are glimpsed, but not a concrete reality. Despite only glimpsing this, we can still be carriers and bringers of those things to the world around us. In this most unusual of Advent seasons, let’s share the light and be bringers of Hope, Peace, Love and Joy to the world around us.

God bless,

Neil


First Sunday in Advent 29th November

Hello again,

It’s Advent Sunday, the beginning of the Church Year. Unlike January 1st when we welcome in something new straight away, the beginning of the church year starts with a period of preparation and waiting – waiting for the gift that we know is coming.

Throughout the story of Jesus’ life, from his conception, the story has been of unlikely things happening, of unlikely people being involved, and things happening in unlikely places – often all three at once! Jesus’ birth was foretold, but the impression had got skewed and the expectations of people were for a very different Messiah to come, and so people weren’t prepared, apart from some wise men from a far-off land.

This year we have spent most of our time in unexpected ways, in unexpected places and often using unexpected methods. We have been outside our comfort zone and it’s been hard at times, but there have also been times of suddenly seeing a different way, or a way that we knew was there but didn’t think we could reach. As we travel through Advent – reflecting on hope, peace, love and joy – I pray that we will use this time to prepare to meet Jesus afresh. I pray that we will let what we have learnt this year, the good things and the more difficult things, allow us to see the unexpected places where Jesus has made a difference and been at work in our lives; that we might be even more ready to welcome Jesus in unexpected ways this Christmas and see hope in a new future.

God bless,

Neil


Second Sunday before Advent 15th November

Hello again,

At Church Council this week, we spent some more time thinking about preparations for Christmas. Obviously we don’t know what restrictions we might be working under, so we aren’t able to nail everything down as much as we would like, but I wanted to share some of the things with you.

First of all, we are going to produce an online version of a traditional Nine Lessons and Carols Service, for which we need some help! Please see Jenny’s notice below. We will also be doing a Christingle service, which will probably be online, using build-it-yourself Christingle packs like we did church last year. We are also planning in the event that we are able to hold services in church in the run-up to Christmas and will be asking people to say whether they would like to come to such a service so we can gauge how many times we’d need to repeat it. Please do look out for a notice on this in a couple of weeks.

God bless,

Neil


Remembrance Sunday 8th November

Hello again,

So, we are back to living with more restrictions again and being encouraged to stay at home as much as we can. I am afraid that the Royal British Legion have had to cancel the  service at the Memorial Hall this Saturday, planned for 11am. We will still open church for a chance to pray and remember on Sunday afternoon, as churches can still open for private prayer, but this will now be from 2-5pm, and will not be advertised widely as had been the plan. This will be a time to pray and perhaps light a candle, but not for mingling in other ways. There will also still be a Remembering Service on Zoom at 6pm on Sunday, the joining instructions will be sent out separately.

The Zoom service on Sunday morning has been rejigged to involve those who had planned to be in a church building and will now start at 10.50. There will be an Act of Remembrance and then a silence at 11am and the service will continue afterwards.

This will again be a difficult time for many people, for different reasons. Please pray. Please keep yourself and others safe, but lets be creative again in supporting those who struggle.

God bless,

Neil


All Saints’ Day Sunday 1st November

Hello again,

It’s the time of the year when we turn to remembering – All Souls’ Day on November 2nd and Remembrance Sunday on November 8th. This year, we are being encouraged to stand on our doorsteps for the 2-minute silence, which will be incorporated into the Zoom service that day. This year many of us have lost family or friends and often we haven’t been able to attend funerals, so we will be opening the church from 1-5pm on November 8th for people to come and pray or light a candle in memory of someone. There will also be an opportunity to leave a name or message on cards in ‘praying hands’, which have been made for us by John, who joins us at Wednesday drop-in. At 6pm, we will have a special ‘Remembering’ service on Zoom, including a time for people’s names to be read out or appear on the screen. If you have someone you’d like included, please let me know by email or phone. The details of the RBL Memorial Hall service are in this bulletin.

The eagle-eyed amongst you may have spotted something new in the bulletin this week. Our Mission Focus this month is the Torch Trust. It’s a new link for us here at Bradwell, and  you may not be aware of the amazing work the Trust does. Their aim is to support people with sight loss, helping them to discover and sustain their faith and to lead fulfilling lives. The Trust has a network of support groups, including here in Milton Keynes, including worship and fellowship, and have lots of experience to share. They also provide brilliant resources, such as large print bibles, which have already made a difference to people we know. Please do pray for their work and check out their website to see more details.

God bless, Neil


Bible Sunday 25th October

Hello again,

It’s the best weekend of the year! What? I hear you cry. It’s the weekend in autumn when the clocks go back and we can have an extra hour in bed. And even if we forget, then unlike in spring when we turn up halfway through, we can just quietly slip out again and come back on time!

I would like to say a big thank you to everyone who joined the church meeting last Sunday afternoon; for those who were nominated to positions of responsibility and for everyone who contributed to the discussions about future services and wider preparations for Advent and Christmas. There were lots of important input and much to chew over and there’ll be more from me about it in the coming few weeks. However, I wanted to say thank you for the great ideas that people shared and for the offers of help in making them happen, although we do need lots more! Please speak to Carol or me if you could help out – there will be all kinds of jobs, large and small, visible and invisible.

It might (or might not…) seem a bit early to be talking about this subject, but it’s clear that coronavirus will mean that this will be a very different Advent and Christmas season for everyone, within church life and in the world in general. We will not be able to do the usual things in the usual way. Yet that does not mean that we won’t be able to celebrate Christ’s coming into the world, nor does it mean that the birth of Jesus is any less Good News for the world than in any other year. In fact, perhaps this year we are more aware than usual that material things aren’t everything. In all this remember Immanuel – God with us.

God bless,

Neil


The nineteenth Sunday after Trinity 18th October

Hello again,

It was lovely to gather in the churchyard last Sunday, it was definitely the correct decision to postpone it for a week! There’s also good news about the roof – do check later in the bulletin – thanks so much to the Fund n Furb team and for everyone who contributed so generously. There’s also important information included here about the Annual Meeting follow-up on Sunday afternoon. We’ll also be using that time to look at restarting services in church and looking forward to Advent and Christmas. On Thursday 22nd at 7.30pm, it’s the Annual Meeting of the whole Partnership, also on Zoom and the details will be sent out shortly. Please do join these two important meetings if you can.

I have been even more aware during the last six months of the power of earnest prayer. This week I came across some amazing artwork painted a few years ago called ‘Beacons of Prayer – see I am doing a new thing’, you can see it here: https://chrisduffett.com/2015/07/09/beacons-and-new-things/. It stemmed from the vision from the Baptist Union General Secretary, Lynn Green – ‘I have this deep sense that God wants to do a new thing and he is calling us to prayer to ‘make space’ for him to speak and move. Let me share with you how I have become convinced of this … God has been speaking to me from Isaiah 43,’forget the former things; do not dwell on the past. See I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the desert and streams in the wasteland’.

At the moment, some things do look more like wasteland than they did at that time. Can we join this prayer and continue to see more of God’s streams springing up in new places?

God bless,

Neil


The eighteenth Sunday after Trinity 11th October

Hello again,

I’m sorry that the weather intervened and we weren’t able to meet for our Outdoor Harvest service last week, but the forecast (as I write at least) is looking much better for this Sunday, so here’s hoping and praying for this week! I hope you’ve been able to use the trail we have suggested for Harvest. I’ve already spoken to people who’ve been able to use it in very different situations, and it’s been great to hear what they’ve noticed. Please do post your reflections on our Facebook page, or bring them to share on the Zoom service this Sunday at 11.

This week we have heard the conclusions of the IICSA review of abuse within the Anglican Church. It has made very sobering reading. Individuals and groups within Christian institutions have prioritised the reputation of the church above the needs of people. It is a stark reminder that attitudes must change. We must not put barriers in the way of abuse being reported, but make sure that those who have suffered are not made to feel as though it is they who are the problem, and act to ensure that perpetrators of abuse cannot repeat it in the future or prolong the suffering of those they have already damaged.

I am extremely grateful for all the hard work that Dawn does as our Safeguarding Officer, we are so blessed to have someone with such experience and expertise, yet I remind you that it is the responsibility of each of us to make any concerns we have known, and to allow the procedures to work. I know we would all like to think that it couldn’t happen here, but that belief has been one of the chief reasons that this inquiry has been necessary.

God bless,

Neil


The seventeenth Sunday after Trinity 4th October
Harvest and Thanksgiving Service

Hello again,

Thank you for everyone who was able to join our Annual Meeting last week. I know that not everyone was able to be part of things on Zoom, but there were very nearly as many present on screen as there were in the building last time.

Thank you to everyone who provided a report or asked questions and especially to those who were elected to serve us all in various roles. We still have a number of vacancies though, and we will have another meeting on October 18th to seek to fill them. Please pray for guidance to know how you can help in this process. I’m very grateful that we have already received a nomination for one of the vacant posts. I would also like to say a massive thank you for their hard work to those who are stepping down from roles this time, especially to Rod for his long service as a Church Officer, stretching back before I arrived, to June for keeping the records straight so we know what we had agreed, to Peter for his many years on Deanery Synod and to Chris for his faithful support. We also remember Ruby, and for all that she and John have contributed to this church over so many years.

This Sunday we are celebrating Harvest in both our usual services, and at 3pm meet for worship in the churchyard, with a devotional ‘treasure hunt’ you can use on your walk home or wherever you are. There will also be chances to gather our reflections on Facebook or Zoom later on Sunday afternoon. It would be great to see you however you are able to join us. Full details of the activities will be sent out in a separate message.

God bless,

Neil


The sixteenth Sunday after Trinity 27th September

Hello again,

Following on from the blog post I shared from the Moderator of the URC, this week, here’s a section of a recent address by the Bishop Steven. It springs from Philippians 2 and speaks of the place of humility in our current time –

‘The humility of Christ will be needed as we seek to rebuild together: the humility which is not only at the heart of the character of Christ but the humility which is at the heart of the pattern of the incarnation, of the substance of Almighty God taking flesh in Christ, of Christ by his Spirit creating the Church as his own Body, to continue his life-giving work in the world, a gentle, tender community of grace.

Humility will be key as we offer to support local communities and build up our neighbourhoods; as we draw alongside those in debt or financial difficulty; as we seek to support families in stress; as we reach out to the isolated and bereaved; as we share the purpose and the hope that we have found in Jesus Christ.

We do not offer what we offer of ourselves: we offer what is ours because of God’s grace to us. We do not offer what we offer from a sense of superiority or to create dependence. We are aware and conscious of our individual and corporate failings, how often we ourselves fall short. We know that as a church we stand in need of deep spiritual renewal. We will begin to find that renewal, I hope and pray, as we continue to centre ourselves on Jesus Christ, on his character, on the pattern of the incarnation and on serving the needs of the communities around us with the gentleness and tenderness of the servant.’

God bless,

Neil


The fifteenth Sunday after Trinity 20th September

Hello again,

There are a few things to share with you this week after our Church Council Meeting.

The first is that I am going to be changing my day off now to be on a Friday. This makes it easier to prepare the services for Sundays and fits in better with the fixed patterns in the family. I appreciate how well you have respected Tuesdays in the past and hope that it won’t be too hard to adapt to Friday.

We are really hoping that the work on the roof will be starting very soon. Thank you so much for the hard work of the Fund n Furb team in this and for everyone’s generosity. We have also been considering again how and when we might think about restarting services in the building. Once we have a firm timescale for the roof work, we will schedule another meeting on Zoom to discuss the possibilities for services. Do look out for the invitation coming soon. Obviously the changing national picture may have an effect on what we can do.

Also, we wanted to celebrate Harvest together in some way. We’ve decided that there will be another Sunday afternoon service on October 4th, which will be organised in a similar way to the one a few weeks ago, but with a Harvest theme. We are also intending there to be a collection point then for non-perishable food items which will be given to the Food Cupboard. If the weather is forecast to be appalling on that day, there will be a contingency day the following Sunday, but we will brave a bit of wind and drizzle.

Please remember the Annual Meeting next Sunday (27th) at 3pm, and do think about your nomination forms too!

God bless,

Neil


The fourteenth Sunday after Trinity 13th September

First I’d like to say a big ‘Thank you!’ to the Sunday housegroup for bringing us this week’s service on the Bradwell website and sent with this bulletin. I really appreciate all their hard work and I’m sure it will be a real benefit to us.

I saw this blog post from the new Moderator of the URC, Rev Clare Downing which I wanted to share.

“The restrictions we are all living under have meant that I’ve been learning about myself amongst many other things – or at least been reminded about some of my foibles and failings. Despite the fact that I don’t fall into any of the high-risk categories, I’ve not been easy to live with. I’ve had to learn to do things differently, whether at work, or by reducing the number of times I go to the supermarket.

The old saying ‘you can’t teach an old dog new tricks’ may be true of dogs (though I have my doubts), but one of the things about being human is that we are eminently adaptable. In other words, we learn. And, as disciples of Jesus, we are – or at least we should be – constantly learning. If we are walking the way with Jesus, then we should be seeing new things, being challenged in new ways. The question ‘Where do we see God at work in these times?’ is a vital one.”

I’ve seen God at work in many people recently. I’ve shared testimonies in this bulletin and we’ve shared on Zoom too, and it’s clear God is at work amongst us. In strange times, the knowledge that God is still present I find a great comfort. Please keep watching and sharing where you hear God and see God at work, that we might learn together.

God bless,
Neil


The thirteenth Sunday after Trinity 6th September

Hello again,

So, it’s now September and the summer break is over. Some of the routines are starting up again, but of course, very little actually is routine.

In particular, schools are beginning term again. It’s been a very difficult time for those involved in education in the last couple of weeks, and there’s a lot to get used to – for staff, pupils and parents. Regulations are still changing and there’s still the issue of exams next summer to solve. Please do continue to pray for everyone involved in education, but also perhaps a message, text or call to those who you know personally to give some encouragement or support would I’m sure be appreciated. Alongside our usual prayer opportunities, Rev Sam at Cross & Stable will be restarting their Friday Prayer meetings (2pm). This is on Zoom, please email if you’d like the joining details.

We’ll also have our Annual Meeting, delayed from April. This will be on Sunday 27th at 3pm. Unless restrictions are eased dramatically, this will be via Zoom. You will be receiving a message with all the information and reports in a separate message, sent at the same time as this bulletin. If you do not have internet access, you can phone in to a Zoom meeting (billed as a London landline call). If you are having trouble getting the reports, please let us know.

There will be vacancies to be filled at this meeting, and it would be great to have them all filled, there will be important issues to be discussed and decisions made over the next few months. Please do pray about whether God might be calling you to one of these roles. If you’d like to know more, please do talk to me or the Church Officers or Council members.

God bless,

Neil


Twelfth Sunday after Trinity 30th August

Hello again,

It was great to be able to be with some of you last Sunday afternoon in the churchyard and to share a time of prayer and reflecting on the Bible. It did feel strange not being able to sit together, to sing and to chat afterwards, but nevertheless, the Holy Spirit was with us, wherever we gathered, in the churchyard or at home. It didn’t even rain either! We are hoping to have another similar chance to gather outdoors next month, and on in the future if we are still not able to gather back in the church building. If you would like a copy of the booklet from the service, please let me know and we’ll email one to you.

Our online world also gives us the opportunity to try new things. This weekend, Sophia and I and the children would normally be spending the Bank Holiday at ONE Event. It involves camping, but it is also also a great opportunity for worship and hearing great speakers and to attend interesting seminars. This year it is being held online, and it’s FREE to access. There are a variety of sessions from 6pm Friday 28th to 11pm Saturday 29th August, so if you’ve opened up this bulletin straight away, you won’t have missed anything. Check it out at www.one-event.org.uk/live.

Or you could go to Greenbelt this weekend too, another long-running festival. There is a full day on Saturday and an hour on Sunday lunchtime. A pass will cost you £10, and allows access the content for the next month, not just live. There are multiple stages covering a whole wealth of topics: social justice issues, faith matters and worship, entertainment, and discussion groups. Full details can be found at https://www.greenbelt.org.uk/wild-at-home/.

Why not try one out?

God bless, Neil


Eleventh Sunday after Trinity 23rd August

Hello everyone,

I wanted to share with you an encouraging testimony I received this week from Ashlee, Jay’s daughter. We praise God for your faithfulness and his abundance!

A Muslim community organisation were holding a fundraiser to help a family I know quite well. When I was giving my contribution I felt that God told me to give a certain amount. This amount, to me, was a lot of money! Giving them this amount would mean that I would have less to pay for my schooling costs. I wasn’t sure if I was really hearing from God so I decided to spend some time in worship. Within a couple of minutes I became sure and gave them the amount to the fundraiser.

I felt God tell me to contribute a bit more. Again, I wasn’t sure if it was just my head or Jesus talking to me so I prayed about it. I remembered how it felt to feel overwhelmed by surrounding circumstances that I, generally, have little control over. Considering the challenges that this family have faced, I had a I appreciation that they probably are facing a similar ‘overwhelming’ feeling too. As a result, I decided to donate more.

The next day, I received an email from the National Youth Arts Trust. They gifted me the exact amount that I had given to the family in the fundraiser!

Just wanted to share this with the congregation as, perhaps, it might bless another.

We are looking forward to our Outdoor Prayer Service this Sunday at 3pm. If you’re hoping to come, you must read the attached document with all the details of what to bring and how this will work. If you have any questions, please phone me in advance. This is in addition to our online services, which will still happen on Zoom and the website.

God bless, Neil


Tenth Sunday after Trinity 16th August

Hello everyone,

As I said in my email a couple of days ago, at the meeting we had on Monday of this week, we again felt that it wasn’t feasible to resume services in the church building for the time being. I realise that this will be a disappointment to some of you, and possibly a relief to others.

We will continue with the Zoom service on Sundays at 11, as well as the service on the website, which is accessible at any time, and the service documents which are included with this bulletin. Last week, the service on the website also had an option to watch the entire service as a single film, as well as watching individual parts as previously. I hope we will be able to continue with this, please do let me know any feedback you have.

In addition, we wanted to find a way of offering the chance to worship together in a way which allows us to stay safe and so there will be an outdoor service in the church grounds on Sunday August 23rd at 3pm.

We’re still working out the details, but we’re taking into account that it won’t be so easy to hear outside (especially when a train goes by…) and there will be individual packs made up with all the material you’ll need so that we can reflect on the Bible and pray together.

We must maintain social distancing between households throughout. If it looks like it might rain, bring an umbrella, but we will obviously reschedule if it’s likely to be torrential!

It would be great if you could bring your own chair with you. If that’s a problem, please let me know and we’ll try to help. More details will be coming out during the next week, so stay tuned.

God bless,

Neil


Service for St Lawrence’s Day 9th August

Happy St. Lawrence Day! (for Monday 10th)
I’m sorry we can’t have a better celebration of it this year, but there’s a St. Lawrence theme for our service on the Bradwell website this week and on the document version sent round with this bulletin, so I hope we can join in the prayers of hope and gratitude over these days.

But why bother with this at all? Often saints are shared between different places and groups of people, but few people realise it and assume total ownership. I have lost count of the number of stunned faces I have seen at St. George’s Day services down the years when I have said that St. George was born in Syria, where the assumption was that he was born and bred in our green and pleasant land and never went anywhere else.

I think for me, the root of having patron saints is that we have a natural desire to link ourselves to the big story, the story of the Gospel and the Church down the years. Of course, it’s not necessary to choose saints, yet I think we all have our heroes don’t we, whether it’s a saint, or a character from the Bible, a preacher from a special service, or someone who was instrumental in our journey to faith. We know that our true hope and example is found only in Jesus, and a saint should never be more important to us than Jesus; yet Jesus used parables to give us memorable ways to hold onto truths, and connection with other faithful people can serve the same function. As we remember St. Lawrence and his reminder of what are the ‘treasures of the church’ may we see more of the promise and hope Jesus brings.

God bless,

Neil


Eighth Sunday after Trinity 2nd August

Hello again!

Over the last few weeks, there seem to be new fault-lines appearing in the response to the coronavirus pandemic. Tensions have always been visible in places, but new ones have emerged as case levels, opinions and priorities have continued to change. Often these surround ideas of whether measures should be mandatory or advisory, and whether the priority should be on public health or safeguarding the economy.  Even as individuals we can find our head and our gut reaction being very different and, of course, we shouldn’t just be focussing on ourselves, but others, especially the poor and marginalised.

I’ve been very interested to read the recent ideas from the Together campaign (which helped to organise the Birthday Clap for the NHS) who are looking at how the sense of togetherness which developed during the lockdown might be encouraged in the future. They are introducing a consultation (together.org.uk) which they hope will help the whole country find our way through what is expected to be a significant recession. In particular, the Bishop of Leeds wrote this for them, which really struck me “We are entering a period of deep economic uncertainty, one that will heighten existing inequalities and strain our society further still.

“We must start to disagree better: Recognising and respecting our differences while remembering our common humanity and citizenship, with all the mutual obligations these demand of us.”

As a church and as society, listening to each other, especially those with whom we disagree and those that we have previously not listened to well enough, such as the Black and Minority ethnic community, and finding a way forward together is not always easy, but it is possible if we have the will.

May God guide us as we play our part.

God bless, Neil


12th July and 19th July Neil on a well earned Holiday
26th July not a message but a S.E.P update


Fourth Sunday after Trinity 5th July

I’d like to say another big thank you to those who sent responses to the survey that was sent out for the last couple of weeks. It was really good to get an idea of people’s thoughts and I very much appreciate the many comments which have obviously been the product of much consideration and prayer.

We have decided that we will not be opening the building for services at present. The services we could offer would be so very different from what we are used to, and we cannot do most of what people were looking forward to. We will review this again next month. At present, none of the other Partnership churches will be starting services, though some have set dates for later this month.

I realise that this will be a disappointment to a few of you. Bradwell Church will still be open for private prayer this week – Tuesday 10-12 and Friday 3-5 – so please do come to pray if you wish. We will of course be maintaining printed and online services and resources as we have been .
There is a sense that we should be looking to develop and improve our online services, and our web presence, and I would love other people to contribute to and lead more in these. If you would like to help, or think someone else would be good at this, or on the tech side, please could you let Rod know

Keep praying please!

God bless, Neil


Third Sunday after Trinity 28th June

Hello again,

I’d like to thank everyone who has responded to the survey we sent last week. I really appreciate the thought you have put into them. Please do this – the answers you give will affect what we decide, so the more we receive the better the decisions will be. You don’t have to write an essay, just say what matters to you.

Last Tuesday, Bradwell church was again open for prayer! I’m very grateful to everyone who helped to prepare things or volunteered to be stewards, and to Rod for bringing it all together. That same day, the government announced that church buildings can have services from July 4th, under certain conditions. Currently, we still await detailed guidelines from our denominations, which we also have to consider before we decide when and how we restart services in the building.

It won’t be business as usual straight away, and we will continue to be online and provide paper services. But I do want to take this opportunity of acknowledging those who have worked, and still are working, so hard during this time. In particular, Alan has spent countless hours on the weekly mailings and working wonders with the website too, Paul has spent a huge amount of time and energy continually trying to make the Zoom services work better as well as maintaining the SEP website, and Tracey and June have worked really hard to bring creativity without chaos to Zoom. I would also like to thank all the various group leaders who have kept fellowship and discipleship going, those who have prayed and contacted people in different ways, along with those who have battled new technology, in the groups or recording for the web. Some of this is seen, but so much is unseen and I am very grateful.

God bless, Neil


Second Sunday after Trinity 21st June

Hello again,

We’re getting used to hearing the changes in coronavirus guidelines as the restrictions are relaxed. Churches can now be open for private prayer under certain conditions. We are working on how to do this safely, and hope to have details out to you very soon.

The changes don’t yet allow us to have public worship, though that won’t be long, we hope.

Yet, we won’t be going straight back to things exactly as they were. Bishop Steven put it like this ‘life is not going to be a quick return to the old normal, but rather a new living with the virus, certainly for the rest of this year and through next year.’ Not everyone will be able to be back in the building from the beginning. We will keep going with online church and the resources we’ve been sending out each week. In the building it will feel strange, numbers will have to be restricted and we will have to be socially-distanced from people we don’t live with. There won’t be singing, or coffee afterwards standing round having a good chat with all our friends.

Whether we’re at home reading something or interacting via a screen, or whether we are in the building, we are all part of God’s church; loved, accepted and forgiven by him. We have learnt a lot from this time of lockdown and I want to make sure we use that well.

I would be really grateful if you would answer the survey I’ve included in the material this week. You can send it to me by email or post (contact detail are in this bulletin). Please answer honestly, rather than what you think I’d like you to say! Your responses will really help us as we manage being able to use the building again.

God bless, Neil


First Sunday after Trinity 14th June 2020

Hello again,

As you may know, I was born and grew up in Bristol. Usually, Bristol doesn’t feature particularly highly on the national and international stage, but events last Sunday have changed that for a while.

When I was a child, the docks were working and the warehouses were busy, and industries like tobacco manufacture were still significant. The signs of the city’s history were visible, but not mentioned. At least, not in the areas of the city with a predominantly white population. Looking back, I am ashamed at some of the attitudes and language that were commonplace. As the city and industries have changed, there has rightly remained a sense of injustice and lack of recognition, in the black community and more widely, as campaigns to change the things which laud the ‘successes’ of the past have been ignored. This sense, fused with the sense of outrage at the events in Minneapolis, is what led to the statue of Colston being torn down by protesters. In the aftermath, the reaction of the Mayor of Bristol speaks volumes ‘What I cannot do as an elected politician is to support criminal damage or social disorder like this, but I would never pretend that a statue of a slave owner in the middle of Bristol – the city in which I grew up and someone who may well have owned one of my ancestors – was anything other than a personal affront to me.’

We are blessed here in Milton Keynes to have such a diverse population and a tradition of welcome. One of the new pillars in the MK Rose has the inscription ‘People from around the world have helped build this city. Milton Keynes welcomes refugees’. However, we cannot pretend that things are perfect here. They aren’t, and injustice and inequality are real. We must not rest on our laurels thinking ‘we’re better than they are in …’ but continue to listen, act and strive to bring injustice and inequality to an end. If you have experience that would help us to take practical steps here, I’d love to hear from you.

God bless, Neil


Trinity Sunday 7th June 2020

Hello again,

Over the last week or so, there have been a lot of changes to the advice and guidelines around coronavirus, and the restrictions we have been living with are being relaxed. So far, these changes haven’t been ones which address public worship, though that will come soon we hope. Yet it is clear that those changes will be gradual and we won’t all be able to be back in church that very first week as though everything’s back to normal.

As we begin to make plans for how this transition might happen, I’d be really interested to hear your views on how we might ensure that those who still need to avoid contact with others can be supported and have access to places and occasions that connect them with God, and how we can be available for all the community here to reflect on their experience and find peace and hope.

However, there has been a new story in the news this week, or rather a new chapter in an old story. The death of George Floyd in Minneapolis has rightly caused outrage all across the world. Christianity Today has an article about George and about the great work he had done in the neighbourhood in Houston where he spent many years. But it also contained a tweet from the local pastor which I thought was particularly important ‘The fact that you have to build a narrative for a man to be loved and given justice is repulsive to me. Even if he was a capital criminal he deserved to be treated as someone created in his image. I’m done coddling Christians that can only love ppl they deem to be lovable.’

It is easy to dismiss this as something that happens in America, but we need to listen to the voices and lived experiences of our black and minority ethnic brothers and sisters in this community and our church, and to have the humility to hear and change in response to uncomfortable truth.

God bless, Neil


Pentecost 31st May 2020

Hello again,

All the talk this week has been about guidelines and rules, about when we can and should use our judgement, and who makes the choice. It has struck me as very relevant in the week that we celebrate Pentecost – the coming of the Holy Spirit to God’s people and the birthday of the church.

When Jesus physically left the earth at the Ascension, he said that the Father would send the Holy Spirit, who would be with us for ever. There are various words that have been used for the Holy Spirit – Advocate, who speaks on our behalf against an accusation; Comforter, who stands by us in our hour of need and makes sure we do not face the future alone; and Helper, the supporter for the journey, either physically, emotionally or with practical instructions. The power of the Holy Spirit can transform people and situations and we should always be eager to listen and to follow the Spirit’s promptings. Yet the Holy Spirit isn’t a resource for us to use to find out how to get what we want, the Holy Spirit is with us to help us discern what it is that God wants, for us and for the world as a whole.

As the restrictions begin to be eased, and the patterns which have become established over the past few months begin to change again, we need the presence and the power of the Holy Spirit to be with us as we go. Unfortunately it isn’t always that simple. The Holy Spirit doesn’t usually write us a note in bold pen and block capitals that we can all read at the same time. It’s so easy just to look for the Spirit to confirm our perspectives. The discernment of the wisdom and guidance of the Spirit is something that requires care, and requires all of us. We all can, and should, be part of it. We need to be on that journey of discovery together.

God bless, Neil


For the Sunday after Ascension 24th May

Hello again,

As I write this, the reports are beginning to come in of the devastation Cyclone Amphan is wreaking as it tracks through India and Bangladesh, and on towards Bhutan. It’s a reminder that coronavirus has not made everything else on the planet stop. Though a great deal of the world is living under some kind of lockdown, the weather carries on regardless – and storms, droughts, floods, fires, volcanoes and earthquakes will not pause and wait until COVID-19 has been brought under control. And the need for millions of evacuated people in these areas to try to maintain social distancing as they have to rely on emergency temporary accommodation only makes things more difficult.

Some of these events appear to be completely beyond our control, yet others are being affected by the changing climate and human activities such as deforestation. I’m sure you have seen the astonishing pictures of the reduction in pollution visible across parts of the world, or seen the graphs of the reduction in CO2 emissions during this time. Can we use this time of enforced watching and waiting to see and understand and be able to shape a new and better reality for the future?

In the Christian calendar, we find ourselves in a similar place – living in a time of watching and waiting, between Ascension and Pentecost, experiencing the loss of Jesus’ physical presence yet looking forward to the promise of a future of new possibilities with the coming of the Holy Spirit. The disciples used their time well, they devoted themselves to prayer, and were ready to move and live in the power of the Spirit and be part of a whole new world. I pray that we too would use this time well, perhaps by using some of the Thy Kingdom Come resources I mentioned last week and joining us for the Partnership Prayer morning on Saturday 30th, and allow the Holy Spirit to shape us, the church and the world to follow God’s path.

God bless,
Neil


Sixth Sunday of Easter 17th May 2020

On Thursday it’s Ascension Day when we mark the end of Jesus’ physical presence on Earth and look forward to a new chapter, empowered by the power of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. For the past few years, this period between Ascension and Pentecost has been the focus of a global, ecumenical effort to promote prayer and the sharing of our faith, called ‘Thy Kingdom Come’ echoing the words of the Lord’s Prayer. This year things are a bit different, obviously. The particular focus is on ‘Prayer and Care’ – Care for those you are praying for, pray for those you are caring for – so often we can separate these things and pray for people or care for people, but not do both.

There are loads of resources available to help and I’d like to encourage families, house groups, groups of friends, to gather on the web, or on the phone and pray and care for each other and for our community, city and the world There’s an app coming out which you can use day by day to help and you can find out more about it all at https://www.thykingdomcome.global/. If you can’t get hold of things on the web, you can order a special prayer booklet, which you can use each year. They are £2 post-free and can be ordered on 01603 785925.

I pray that this will be a time where we see God’s Kingdom coming, in many different ways and in many different lives. Our world may look different at the moment, yet the Spirit of God is still active and powerful.

God bless,
Neil


Fifth Sunday of Easter 10th May 2020

This was a weekend when many plans had been made for celebrations to mark VE Day, and sadly things have turned out very differently and we have had to remember in alternative ways. VE Day was a great day for many, many people, but not everyone – because it was not the end of the war. Many people were still fighting further afield and many more casualties were coming.

As I write, there are the reports that next week might see the easing of some of the lockdown restrictions, and I’m sure many of us will rejoice at some of the new-found freedoms. Of course, this  isn’t the moment of total victory either, but a marker post on the way, and there is still much that needs to be done to combat the danger of the coronavirus – and even when we have reached the end of the journey in this country, there are other places where the battle will not yet be won.

Which brings me neatly to Christian Aid Week, which starts on Sunday. The coronavirus has the potential to be even more devastating to those countries where healthcare provision is already difficult and where people live in so much need. As well as the direct health effects, the slowdown in richer economies has also had a massive effect on some of the poorest people too. For example, the fashion industry has cancelled orders made, with no compensation for those who make the garments and are paid so little for doing so (see https://traidcraftexchange.org/fast-fashion-crisis).

Christian Aid’s work is more important than ever at the moment, so please help if you can, especially as the usual fundraising can’t happen. You can donate online at caweek.org/payin.


Fourth Sunday of Easter 3rd May 2020

Hello again!

I’m writing this on the day when we’re hearing the wonderful events on the 100th birthday of ‘Captain Tom’. His story has been an inspiration to so many people and a bright light amongst the difficult news that we’ve been hearing in recent weeks. There have been so many tributes and honours from so many places, and it’s so brilliant to see how something that started in a small way, aiming to make a bit of a difference and making an effort to do what we can, can capture the imagination of everyone. In a world where there are so many people who are seeking the limelight and are doing and saying things to get recognition, it has been so refreshing to see how a genuine small voice can achieve so much.

This Sunday’s gospel reading reminds us that Jesus is the Good Shepherd, and that the sheep follow the shepherd because they know him and they know and trust his voice. They don’t listen to someone who says they are the great shepherd if they’ve never heard of them. They don’t listen to someone whose words don’t match their actions. They listen for, and listen to, the voice that they recognise and they have a genuine relationship. I pray that even in the time that we’re currently living in, we can keep on listening for and to the voice of Jesus and trust and follow him.

God bless,
Neil


Third Sunday of Easter April 26th 2020

Hello again!

So, as was expected, the social distancing regulations have been extended and that things will be carrying on the way they have been. I don’t know if it’s just me, but looking back to how things were: when we could meet in church, when we could go where we wanted, when we wanted, feels like going back much longer in history. When there is great change or uncertainty, time can do strange things, it appears.

I wonder if the disciples felt a bit like this just after the first Easter Day? Was it only a couple of Sundays ago, that we came into Jerusalem and everyone was cheering Jesus? Was it before or after he said that he would be betrayed and would die that he said ‘Do not let your hearts be troubled’? Which day did you see him last week, before or after Thomas? It wasn’t easy for them to get their head around things and they had to be patient and wait for when Jesus chose to appear and listen to what he wanted to say at that point. And as they were patient, and listened, the new path became clearer; as Jesus ascended and the day of Pentecost came, the church was born in a new way.

We are trying to frame a new reality on a timescale we can’t control. We can’t decide what the new ‘normal’ will look like and how close it will resemble what’s gone before. Yet we can still influence what is built, and we know who is walking the journey with us.  If we are alert to the Holy Spirit as we go, we might still feel anxious or confused, we might still want things to move faster, or slower, yet we will be able to recognise, and grow, God’s kingdom in the world as it will be.

God bless,
Neil



Second Sunday of Easter April 19th 2020

Alleluia, Christ is Risen! He is risen indeed, alleluia!

It was brilliant to be able to share those words with so many of you last weekend. And the sentiment is true, however we feel about the situation at the moment. For the world out there, Easter is over – the eggs etc. would be gone from the shops, except perhaps for a few sad ones on the reduced shelf, and we would have moved on to the next occasion, perhaps looking forward to the summer holiday season. In church though, Easter is a season, it is for a longer period of time, and I’m glad of that, even more so this year. In this season we hear of the disciples meeting the risen Christ and we hear of them trying to work out what faith in Jesus means now and working out how live and worship in this new reality.

As we work out how we are to be in these very different days, I believe that we can learn much from these episodes, from the way in which the disciples new pathways and new patterns. They took what they knew from before and what they were experiencing now and, by the power of the Holy Spirit, created a new community of faith. May we ask the Spirit to be with us as we seek to live out our faith in this time, and on into the future.

God bless,
Neil



Sunday 12th April 2020 Easter Day

Hello again. This was not the Easter we expected, is it? Things are strange. And though in some ways we are getting used to the new ways of being, in others things are beginning to fray around the edges a bit, which is perfectly natural but doesn’t always feel very nice.

Usually I’m writing as if it were Sunday, and celebrating the resurrection. This year it’s going to be going out to each of us earlier, when we’re still experiencing Good Friday. And maybe that’s helpful, actually. Because this year we are all in a difficult place. The women of Jerusalem are weeping. Many of us are in isolation, without our family and friends, alone and frightened. This is a path Jesus has walked before us. Some of us are facing hard times and it feels like the disciples have scattered. Some of us are in a place of danger, at the foot of the cross with Mary and the women who cared for Jesus. Go back to the story. Read it slowly. Find yourself there. And know that God who holds the world in being has walked this path before, is walking it with us, and holds us in his arms. And know that Friday is not the end of the story. Know that Saturday, with Jesus in the grave and hope smashed, is not the end. Sunday is coming. Death cannot hold him, or us. The temple curtain will be torn in two, and NOTHING can separate us from the love of God

God bless,
Neil



Sunday 5th April 2020

Hello, again! It was lovely to be able to see lots of you last Sunday at our service on Zoom, it was quite overwhelming to have contact with so many people all at the same time again. Thank you for your comments and we will continue to build on what we do and learn from experience. I know that not everyone is able to join in with all the web-based things, but we are trying to make sure we use lots of different ways to allow you to join in. Please do keep a look-out for what’s happening!

As we enter this Holy Week together and journey towards Easter, we can’t join together in the ways we’ve been used to, but we can still join with God and encourage each other. You might like to start the day by reading the Bible, I’ve put suggestions later on. There is also a great set of resources for different ways of exploring the journey done by Chelmsford Diocese, called ‘Holy Week at Home’, which you can find here: https://www.chelmsford.anglican.org/holyweekathome

Through all this, we will find bits that we really miss from the usual pattern, but there will be new things we discover. I pray that you will see something afresh this Holy Week as we walk this path together and with our Lord Jesus Christ.

God bless,
Neil



Sunday 29th March 2020

Looking back, it’s astounding to see how much the UK (and the rest of the world) has changed in a few short days. As I write, it’s only been a couple of days of the newest restrictions and I don’t think I’ve properly taken in how things will be over the next three weeks at least. Church is now closed, for everything. Not even the slimline weddings, baptisms or funerals are permitted – though minimal funerals can go ahead at the crematorium or graveside.

I hope you were able to use the service material we sent out last week. This week, the Bradwell Church website (see below) will include a service for you to follow yourself, with clips to click on for music, readings etc. as you go through. Documents to print out are also also sent out with this bulletin. Some of us have been able to meet across the web, and we’re looking to extend that. Please keep in touch with your contacts, on the web, on the phone, even by letter if your daily walk passes a postbox! We need to keep ourselves and our community safe, yet we also need to help each other wherever we can do it safely. We also, most of all, need to remember that God is with us this week, just as every week, and there are so many ways we can be helped to keep close to God even if we can’t be close to each other in space. If you’re struggling to find something suitable, please do give me a call.

God bless,
Neil